History of Makeup - Part 3 - The birth of Today's Makeup.

History of Makeup – Part 3 – The birth of Today’s Makeup.

This is the last part of the series on the History of Makeup. Part one was on the ancient worlds makeup, then we moved onto Part 2: the Mid Century Europe makeup trends. Finally we look at the birth of today’s Makeup industry. We start this blog with one of the most controversial quotes by one of our fore-mothers of makeup.

“There are no ugly women, only lazy ones.” – Helena Rubinstein

Slowly after the Mid Century of European times, makeup was worn again but it was still all about natural tones with pink cheeks to give that healthy look. It was not until the late 1900’s that makeup really changed and was the era of the modern makeup industry was born. The first manufactured mascara was formulated by Eugène Rimmel based on a mix of coal dust and Vaseline petroleum jelly, In this time house hold names Helena Rubinstein, Elizabeth Arden, Max Factor where born. It was in the 1920’s when the Flapper style came alive which embraced dark eyes or a “Smoky Eye”, red lipstick, red nail polish, and the suntan and Coco Chanel invented it as a fashion statement. In the wake of Chanel’s statement of the suntan, many fake tans were developed to gain this new sun kissed fashion statement. But in Asia the lighter skin is most wanted as it still represents of the higher-class statute and is most popular skincare product today sold in Asia and India.

Lipsticks were colorful and cheap due to the metal container developed by Maurice Levy and thus making them one of the most popular cosmetics of this time over rouge and powder. The eyebrow pencil also went through its own revolution with the formulation of cottonseed oil.

During the Second World War many of the cosmetic ingredients were used in the supply of war items and lipstick, powders and creams were luxury. The major cosmetics houses created funky and patriotic packaging. Think powder puffs in the shape of military caps, Tangee’s ‘Lips in Uniform’ shade or Helena Rubenstein’s notorious ‘Regimental Red’ lipstick. Though many women could not afford to buy the store stock in fact many women working in the war effort factories had to wear protective foundation to preserve their skin from the ghastly chemicals especially those working in ordnance factories. Once again Beetroot was a favorite lip and cheek stain but some even used boot-polish mascara which endangered their eyes. Plus there was a black market of face powder made from chalk and alchemical potion based on margarine.

During the war and onwards we see the rise of Movie Stars who influenced the makeup looks with the Audrey Hepburn’s deeply outlined cat eyes, Marilyn Monroe’s pale skin and red lips in 1950’s. The 1960/70’s saw the hippie movement and the rise of the feminist movements objecting to cosmetics it was the when two looks were bared natural by day and sexual by evening.

It was in the 1970’s when makeup foundations were being made for the darker skin ladies as the makeup made for pale skin looked grey on dark skin. Heavily lined eyes continued through the ’70’s and ’80’s with a wide range of eye shadow colors and the development of lipstick colors like lilac, silver, green and black. Despite the anti feminist movement against cosmetics it was this very industry that open the doors for women to gain their independence.

Today Makeup Trends

Makeup continued to evolve as cosmetic technology reached new levels of sophistication to meet the diverse age group with the baby boomers demanding to look younger. Today’s trend is moving towards the more natural look lightly dusted healthy pink cheeks. Evening is the double winged black eyeliner. As we move through the twenty first century we will see a blending of styles from the past adding a modern twist and inspired by new formulas in the makeup industry.

Read: History of Makeup – Part 1 Ancient Societies

Read: History of Makeup – Part 2 – Early Europe

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QUESTION ABOUT YOUR SKIN?  Make an Appointment Today or send me an email to debra@debraspence.com

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Content Copyright © 2016, Debra Spence

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Debra Spence is a Qualified Medical Aesthetician, Cosmetic Scientist, Lecture and Author. Owned of an Australian National Award Winning Medi Spa. Now is concerntrating on Education of Skin and Skincare plus provideing advance treatments to her private patients. Plus developing Zen Dejour a Result Based Cosmeceutical Skincare Range and Dermal Solution Private Lable Professional Skincare.

QUESTION ABOUT YOUR SKIN? Make an Appointment Today or send me an email to debra@debraspence.com

PERMISSION TO REPRINT: You may use this article in your print, blog, magazine or electronic newsletter. But in order to do so, you must include the following paragraph “Information courtesy from Debra Spence – Answering your skin problems with Science and Nature. Debra Spence is a Cosmetic Chemist and Skin Specialist who provides skincare and treatment tips, product recommendations and reviews to professionals and patients. www.debraspence.com” Content Copyright © 2017, Debra Spence

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